Corinthian Cylindrical Pyxis

 

Corinthian Cylindrical Pyxis

An ancient Corinthian cylindrical lidded pyxis painted with bands of geometric decoration.

Corinth.
Middle Corinthian, ca. 600-575 BC.
Diameter: 4 in. (10 cm).

The pyxis was a lidded cylindrical vessel mostly used by women to hold cosmetics, trinkets or jewelry. Surviving pyxides from the Classical Period are mostly ceramic, but sometimes they are made of wood, metal, or ivory. The name derived from Corinthian boxes made of wood from the boxwood tree (puxos).
The production of pottery from the northern Peloponnesian city of Corinth began around 720 BC and continued until about 550 BC. Corinthian clay is much more pale than the iron rich red clay of Athens in Attica that later supplanted it as the main Greek export ware in the Mediterranean.

Formerly in a South German private collection, acquired in the 1970's.

Inv#: 5077

$1,250

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More Images:

  • Corinthian Cylindrical Pyxis
  • Corinthian Cylindrical Pyxis
  • Corinthian Cylindrical Pyxis
  • Corinthian Cylindrical Pyxis

 

 

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